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[Apocalypse (Revelation) 8:13]

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Chesterton On Smoking

Chesterton On Smoking
Fr. Kramer: The late Fr. Gregor Hesse S.T.D.: "God made tobacco to be smoked." - sententia certa (!) He was right!

 G.K. Chesterton was an early 20th century English writer, journalist,theologian, poet, dramatist, literary and art critic, biographer, cultural observer and anthropologist, philosopher, orator, and Christian apologist. He was also a wine drinking, cigar smoking raconteur that would have been in good company with Mark Twain. The following are some of his comments regarding smoking.
"To have a horror of tobacco is not to have an abstract standard of right; but exactly the opposite. It is to have no standard of right whatever; and to make certain local likes and dislikes as a substitute. Nobody who has an abstract standard of right and wrong can possibly think it wrong to smoke a cigar. It is a vague sentimental notion that certain habits were not suitable to the old log cabin or the old hometown. It has a vague utilitarian notion that certain habits are not directly useful in the new amalgamated stores or the new financial gambling-hell. If his aged mother or his economic master dislikes to see a young man hanging about with a pipe in his mouth, the action becomes a sin; or the nearest that such a moral philosophy can come to the idea of a sin. A man does not chop wood for the log hut by smoking; and a man does not make dividends for the Big Boss by smoking; and therefore smoking has a smell as of something sinful."
"Incidentally, I must say I can bear witness to this queer taboo about tobacco. Of course numberless Americans smoke numberless cigars; a great many others eat cigars, which seems to me a more occult pleasure. But there does exist an extraordinary idea that ethics are involved in some way; and many who smoke really disapprove of smoking.
I remember once receiving two American interviewers on the same afternoon; there was a box of cigars in front of me and I offered one to each in turn. Their reaction (as they would probably call it) was very curious to watch. The first journalist stiffened suddenly and silently and declined in a very cold voice. He could not have conveyed more plainly that I had attempted to corrupt an honorable man with a foul and infamous indulgence; as if I were the Old Man of the Mountain offering him hashish that would turn him into an assassin. The second reaction was even more remarkable. The second journalist first looked doubtful; then looked sly; then seemed to glance about him nervously, as if wondering whether we were alone, and then said with a sort of crestfallen and covert smile: "Well, Mr. Chesterton, I'm afraid I have the habit."
"The Catholic Church is like a thick steak, a glass of red wine, and a good cigar."
"In Catholicism, the pint, the pipe and the Cross can all fit together."